Ultraviolet Blood Irradation (UBI)

Ultraviolet Blood Irradiation claim that UV light exposure kills germs such as viruses, bacteria, and fungi inside the body, and that it neutralizes toxins in the blood. Some claim that when even a very small amount of UV-treated blood re-enters the circulatory system of the patient it stimulates the immune system and increases attacks against invaders, including cancer cells.

The blood that is exposed to the ultraviolet light continues to emit secondary radiation and some scientists believe that this may be the way that the ultraviolet blood irradiation has cumulative effects. Each treatment also builds on and enhances the effects of previous treatments.

Laboratory studies have demonstrated that UV light deactivates viruses and bacteria. Clinically, the general hypothesis is that UNI penetrates and destroys viral and bacterial walls (but not white and red blood cells), with the residual debris stimulating an antibody- antigen reaction, facilitating destruction of intact viruses and bacteria by macrophage (a large scavenger cell) white blood cell.

Ultraviolet blood irradiation treatment is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treating T-cell lymphoma involving the skin. Clinical trials look promising for the treatment of immune system diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, rejection of transplanted organs, and graft-versus-host disease (a complication relation to bone marrow or stem cell transplants). Available scientific evidence does not support claims for alternative uses of UV irradiation.

  • Physiologically, UBI has been shown to:
  • Increase blood oxygen levels
  • Deactivate bacteria, viruses, and fungal growths
  • Cause a detoxification effect, deactivating both snake venoms and bacterial toxins
  • Enhance phagocytosis (engulfing of foreign matter/debris/microbes/tumor cells) by activated macrophage cells.
  • Cause vasodilatation and decrease oedema
  • Activate steroids and cortisone-like molecules (sterols) including vitamin D
  • Control nausea and vomiting

“Ultraviolet blood irradiation treatment is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treating T-cell lymphoma and involving the skin. Clinical trials look promising for the treatment of immune system diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, rejection of transplanted organs, and graft-versus-host disease…).”

-American Cancer Society Web Page